Archive for October, 2010


Night Photography

Sunday, October 17th, 2010

Here is a collection of Long Exposure Night Photographs taken on a Vivitar v3800n. For these shots I used a tripod and a shutter release cable. I used the shutter release to keep the shutter open for long periods of time, which enabled me to capture as much natural light as possible. The exposure times in these photographs range from between 3 minutes to 30 minutes, depending on the light conditions at the time. The tripod is simply used to keep the camera steady (avoiding blurry images).

Analogue Night Photography

Analogue Night Photography

Analogue Night Photography

Analogue Night Photography

Analogue Night Photography

Analogue Night Photography

Analogue Night Photography

Analogue Night Photography

Analogue Night Photography

Analogue Night Photography

Analogue Night Photography

Analogue Night Photography

My first attempts at Fisheye Photography

Thursday, October 7th, 2010

Here are the results from my first 2 films using a Fisheye2 Camera. I used 400 iso colour Fujifilm Superia X-tra for these snapshots

Fisheye Lomo Photography
Double exposure of my VW Camper and myself.

Fisheye Lomo Photography
Another double exposure – for this shot I steadied the camera on my knee and took a 3 second exposure down the street using the “bulb” setting, then set the shutter back to normal and took a photograph using the built in flash of myself and my girlfriend.

Fisheye Lomo Photography
And again… This time I took the self portrait first using the flash, then spun around, using the bulb setting to capture the streak of street lights.

Fisheye Lomo Photography
For this shot I took a picture of the sky at dusk, I then had a happy accident and managed to take a picture of myself over the top.

Fisheye Lomo Photography
Same kind of dusk shot, but not so much an accident with the second exposure.

Fisheye Lomo Photography
I had to take this shot, I really liked the contrast between the bright daylight and the strong shadow which was cast by the hillside… Plus y
ou can’t own a fisheye and not take a landscape shot!

Fisheye Lomo Photography
I took this shot about 1ft away from the front of my camper van, I love how vehicle’s look when you take a shot like this.

Fisheye Lomo Photography
Triple exposure consisting of a long exposure night shot, followed by a self portrait and finished off with a quick twist of the camera body to capture the streak of street lights.

Fisheye Lomo Photography
Erm, what can I say… I thought this would look funny… and it does.

Fisheye Lomo Photography
And again…

Fisheye Lomo Photography
This shot was taken from inside my camper van, followed by the second exposure which was a shot of the sky taken out of the van window.

Fisheye Lomo Photography
These shots look great with a fisheye lens, get as close to the ground as possible!

Fisheye Lomo Photography
And again… trying not to get the camera wet this time!

Fisheye Lomo Photography
And finally, with this photo I was simply trying to fit the whole of my parents house into one shot. I really want to take alot more shots of buildings and structures, I really enjoy the way the lens distorts what are normally straight lines.

Fisheye Photography

Saturday, October 2nd, 2010

Fisheye photography captures an extremely wide hemispherical image, the lens usually used produces a wide-angle of up to 180 degrees.  The fisheye lens was originally created for use in meteorology and was originally named the “whole-sky lens”, but has since become a very popular tool for photographers for its abilities to create unique and sometimes very humourous effects.

Fisheye Lomo Photography
Picture taken on a Lomography Fisheye2 camera.

If you are at all interested in taking your own fisheye photos, then I strongly suggest you look into the Lomography Fisheye2 camera. It’s a really great compact 35mm camera, with a built in flash (which is great for night photography), a “bulb” setting for those long exposure shots and a multiple exposure button which allows you to layer 2 or more exposures to create a single photograph. The lens gives out a 170 degree field of vision and you can take photographs from as little as 3cm from your subject, out of all the cameras I own, this is definately my favourite!

When I first got this camera I used 2x 35mm films as an experiment – to see the results from those 2 films – Click here.

Long Exposure Photography

Saturday, October 2nd, 2010

Long exposure photography is simply the use of a long-duration shutter speed when taking a photograph. This technique is commonly used in poor light conditions or at night because more light can be absorbed by leaving the camera’s shutter open for a longer period of time.

The basic concept is that, the longer you leave the shutter open, the brighter the image will become. So this is a very useful technique when taking photographs in low light conditions.

One main point to note when taking a long exposure shot, is that anything that moves while the camera’s shutter is open will become blurred. For this reason, it is strongly suggested that you use a tripod when producing a long exposure photograph.

"Marazion Beach"

Analogue Photography

Saturday, October 2nd, 2010

"Lights of Newlyn"

Analogue (or Analog) Photography is a term for photography which uses a chemical process to produce an image onto photographic film or plate. The chemical process used for photograhic film is called “gelatin-silver”.

Photographic film is coated with a photographic emulsion containing silver halides. When light falls upon these silver halides it produces a latent image upon the film.

When taking analogue photograghs, the camera’s shutter system opens to allow light to fall upon the film inside, which forms the latent image.